Tag Archives: Earthquake

Fallout Fears (Part 1)

A nuclear power plant (NPP), an example of a key source of energy for much of the world. (Source: picture-newsletter.com, photographer unknown)

As I write this post, Japan is still reeling and recovering from a devastating trifecta of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear threat. The country has suffered a terrible three-headed beast of a disaster, and it’s taking a toll, not only on the country, people, and economy of Japan, but on the world’s mindset on nuclear energy.

For years and years, nuclear power has been viewed as a viable and clean source of alternative energy in much of the developed and developing world. But after the shocking triple tragedy in Japan, there has been growing fear and apprehension towards nuclear power plants and  nuclear energy, as the safety of this source is being called into question.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in Germany, where seven reactor facilities are being temporarily shut down for safety testing, and Chancellor Angela Merkel has, for what many think is a mix of political and safety reasons, called into question the entire country’s nuclear power supply.

This kind of thinking has taken root all across the European Union and in many other parts of the world, including the United States. But is this anything more than hasty reactionary thought sparked by the ongoing crisis in Japan? There was little outcry or objection to nuclear energy sources before the disaster, but since the radiation dangers in Japan have caught international attention, leaders and thinkers have begun to reconsider whether nuclear energy is a safe option.

Now, it’s of course natural to look into one’s own energy systems’ safety precautions, especially right after a disaster such as the one in Japan. But the kind of panicked shut-downs and alarm seen in places like Germany in response to the crisis are, in my opinion, blown far out of proportion, and have potential to greatly damage popular perception of nuclear energy.

Nuclear energy has given us the opportunity to create quite substantial amounts of energy at little cost to the environment, especially when compared to other sources such as “clean” coal. A 2008 study that examined the relative emissions of a nuclear power plant and a fossil fuel plant found that the fossil fuel plant had emitted around 11 million tons of waste in a year, while the NPP emitted a mere 26 tons. There’s really no arguing that this is one of the cleanest energy sources available to us.

Besides that, the dangers of NPPs really do not exceed those of other energy sources, especially coal. It’s estimated that two to three thousand workers die in coal mining accidents every year in China, and explosions and collapses still kill dozens of workers every year in the United States. So why is it that people are so afraid of nukes?

Because this post is becoming rather lengthy, I’ve decided to split it into two parts. Check back soon for part two!

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Japan’s Nuclear Nightmare

Fukushima I, the power plant currently in danger of melting down.

Even after all the horrifying destruction Japan has faced over the last few days in the aftermath of a record-setting earthquake and tsunami, the country may have yet another catastrophe on their hands.

A nuclear power plant (NPP) called Fukushima I has been having some major difficulties remaining stable, after the combination of earthquake and tsunami left it badly damaged, and a number of other NPPs have been damaged as well. The government and power company operating the NPP are now saying that there’s a possibility that two reactors are currently melting down, an event which could release great amounts of radiation into the air and water.

It’s still not quite clear at this point (to the best of my knowledge) what the extent of such an accident would be. Experts are saying that the current situation in Japan is already among the top three worst nuclear accidents in the history of nuclear power, along with the events at the Three Mile Island plant in 1979 and the awful disaster that was Chernobyl. But there’s still the possibility of this crisis-waiting-to-happen taking first place for nuclear catastrophes.

Part of the problem here is that the Japanese government has been waffling on the exact state of affairs. The reports given by government officials have vacillated between “it’s only a minor leak to relieve pressure” and “nuclear meltdown is underway.” So it’s been hard to say and see exactly what might be happening, and how severe consequences might be. However, an international security expert said on a fascinating CNN video that the situation is more likely to turn out alright, rather than as a catastrophe (though he doesn’t rule out the chance that a nuclear catastrophe might occur).

The expert posits that the authorities’ tactic for solving the problem is one that would render the NPPs completely and permanently inert. The plan at this point is to flush the reactors with seawater and boric acid. According to the expert in the video, these methods should not only stop the reactors from working temporarily, but completely destroy their ability to produce nuclear energy. A willingness to do something so drastic is a good indicator of the seriousness of this situation. If the government and the power company who runs the plants are willing to suffer the permanent loss of these NPPs, then they must see the possibility of a huge meltdown. It is encouraging though, that the government and the electric company running the plants are willing to take a loss to shut these down.

As I said in a previous post, this situation is still far from resolved. Death tolls are rising dramatically as rescue workers search for the wounded or dead, and the country is tense under the threat of a possible nuclear crisis. All anyone can really do now is offer ny assistance and support they can.

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Devastation in Japan

Unprecedented destruction on the coast of Japan.

On March 11, Japan was struck with disaster. A colossal earthquake, the largest in 1,200 years, rumbled in the Pacific to the east of the island nation. The initial quake and its aftershocks caused great damage throughout the country, but, as often happens, the real catastrophe came with the water.

Tsunami waves have pounded the eastern coast of Japan, leaving as many as 1,000 dead and thousands more missing or unaccounted for, leading authorities to fear that many more casualties are still possible. Oil refineries have exploded, trains have derailed, and countless homes and buildings have been swept away or utterly destroyed by this disaster.

I really find myself at a loss as to what to say about this tragedy. The fact that thousands can be killed and thousands more have their livelihoods destroyed in such a meaningless and horrific disaster is appalling and terrifying. What answer is there for this? What purpose could possibly be behind this kind of calamity? I really can’t claim to know. I have close friends in Japan at this very moment that I haven’t heard from, and Japanese friends here in the US who haven’t been able to contact their own families.

This is still a developing story, so there’s still a lot of uncertainty as to what has really happened and what will happen next. But for now, all I can do is implore anyone reading this to pray for the people of Japan in whatever way they see fit, and offer whatever support and affection they can to any who were affected by this disaster.

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