Seeking the Spiritual: The Intimate Bond of Culture and Religion

Grow up in a different culture, and chances are you'll follow a different faith.

One of the very important things that I’ve been realizing about the world and the people in it over the last few months is the level to which religion is a cultural tradition and inheritance. This may seem like an extremely obvious conclusion for anyone to come to, but for me, this has been a difficult thing. As I’ve mentioned in a number of previous posts, I was brought up in a strongly Christian environment. For most of my life, when I was an adherent of evangelical Christianity, I rarely, if ever, questioned why I believed what I did. If I were to seriously ask myself this question a few years ago, my answer would’ve been, “Because you know that it’s true!”

But recently, I’ve allowed my old conceptions of religion and people be challenged and remodeled. This has been partially due to my travels over the last summer to France, Holland, Greece, and most importantly, Turkey. I’ve had the privilege of seeing how other people live their faith, particularly in the case of Islam, as I experienced life in a country where the (very) dominant religion is one very different from what I had experienced for the greater part of my life. I also have a great many friends from China (due to the large international student program at my school), and getting to know them and their fascinating culture has helped my understanding of Eastern thought to broaden.

Here’s where I’m going with this. Over recent months, I’ve discovered more and more that the reason I believed what I did for most of my life has been because I grew up with it, in a mini-culture that told me that the right thing to believe was Christianity. And more importantly, I’ve realized that others (again, this sounds like an obvious point), particularly those in vastly different parts of the world like Turkey, have grown up being taught that the right thing to believe was Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, or even atheism. I can see now that so much of what I “believed” was simply what had been passed down to.

Now, this is only natural. Parents teach their children what they think is right, and in fact many holy books instruct parents to do this (Proverbs 22:6 of the Bible, for example). But when someone becomes a brash conversionist (I know, I made it up) with their religion, they seem to leave sanity behind in their mad rush to change others to their way of thinking. What I mean by “leaving their sanity behind,” is that these religious practitioners have so thoroughly convinced themselves of their own rightness and the wrongness of others, that they forget that they probably only believe what they do because they were raised that way!

More frightening than that though, they forget that the beliefs that others hold dear are ones that they were always raised on as well. The reason for their belief in whatever religion it may be is their upbringing, not some deep-seated and witless desire to be a heretic. So when you get down to the heart of the issue, an evangelical Christian (this is only an example) and the young Indian Hindu he is trying to convert both believe in their respective religions for the same reason: They were always taught to.

I strongly believe that if more people, from all places, traditions, and religions could accept this, there would be far fewer people condemning each other for what seem to me to be obviously cultural influences. No person can decide the circumstances of their birth, and it’s a terrible thing that religious people of all kinds issue bold proclamations that anyone who doesn’t accept their truth, including young children who have heard nothing about it, is doomed. Truth be told, this is a pretty typical trait of the evangelical Christian in particular. I was talking with an evangelical acquaintance of mine about this very issue, not too long ago. I asked her, “What about an orphaned child in India? Chances are they’re going to grow up learning Hinduism as their religion. What happens if that child dies, and they’ve never heard anything about the Christian god?” She answered (paraphrase), “God’s justice is different from our justice. It’s sad that it has to happen, but the Bible says that anyone who doesn’t accept Jesus Christ is going to hell, no matter what. And that’s just the way it is!”

There is something desperately wrong with that picture.

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7 Comments

Filed under Religion & Reason, Seeking the Spiritual

7 responses to “Seeking the Spiritual: The Intimate Bond of Culture and Religion

  1. Very interesting. You may be equally interested in a reflection to the question “Why we have more than one religion on our planet” by a Pioneer in the field. http://www.spiritualhuman.wordpress.com
    see the post by related to more than one religion. Hope it is on interest. Good Luck on your journey.

    • Connor

      Thanks for your feedback! I checked out the post, the speech from Hasan Askari, and I really like what he says there. Thanks for letting me know about it!

      • My pleasure. He is my late father. I am gald you found it intersting. You may also be interested in his (selected) reflection on Human Nature from my blog. Spiritually, innerly; perhaps we need more than one way of Praising, Asking for Help and Adoring. We need diversity as a limit on the exclusivity of others and the worst of what that one-sidedness can bring; self righteousness being the worst. One more: “The are only Four communities”; as a spiritual person yourself; you may like this post. All this sounds like a plug, I am equally interested in your thoughts and reflections and will try to keep up with your future postings. Best Wishes, Musa Askari (SpiritualHuman)

  2. Connor

    Thanks so much! I’ll keep up with yours as well, and thank you for letting me know about those posts. Don’t worry, it doesn’t sound like a plug. I really appreciate your thoughts on this, and I completely agree. We need diversity and an inclusive spirit, not exclusivity.

  3. So glad you liked this. (for a more expansive view on this theme highly recommend Speech by Hasan Askari on Spiritual Humanism – on my home page) On the book Jesys in the World’s Faith; yes I know the book. It was edited by Professor Gregory Barker whom I know well; a kind person. I am familiar with the section you refer to by Hasan Askari, my late father, titled “The Real Presence of Jesus in Islam”. My blog is dedicated to his work and Vision. Many thanks for comments.

    Thanks also for comments on the reflection the Lord of the Humming Bird. You may also like the post “The Feet of our Lady” by Hasan Askari on my blog.

  4. Connor

    Great, thanks so much again!

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